Monday, 28 September 2020

CLOUDS AND SUNRISES AND SKYSCAPES OVER HUTTON ROOF

See below for the new Cloud and Sunrise photo blog, I will be updating more shortly.

Links: 

"FOR UP TO DATE" 2020 Visible Bird Migration records Click over this link

The new Orchid book "Britains Orchids" by Sean Cole and Mike Waller - please click this link for details.

Varieties of our local Hutton Roof Gentians and the reason for the 50/50 Purple and White, plus my research survey results. Plus "Upland Enchanters Nightshade (circae x intermedia)

 More Autumn Gentian photos (2020) can be seen here

Northern Greenland Wheatear (Oenanthe o. leucorrhoa)
Crossbills (chicks in late December etc)


This is my Cloud and Sunrise photos which I take early on during the vismig season (early morning count birds on their migrations from up on Vicarage Lane, Burton In Kendal.  The sunrises usually are over Hutton Roof or Dalton Areas.  Please enjoy.


Tuesday September 29th 2020 (below







The above 7 photos show how the mist was filling in the valley over Burton In Kendal and towards Farleton Knott and the Lakes in general.

Monday September 28th 2020 (below)





All the above photos were showing the sunrise looking over Hutton Roof at about 0700hrs. 

26th September 2020 (below)




24th September 2020 (below)











All the above were taken on 24th September 2020

31st October 2019



Wednesday, 23 September 2020

"Britain's Orchids " by Sean Cole and Mike Waller with artwork by Sarah Stribbling

 

Links: 

"FOR UP TO DATE" 2020 Visible Bird Migration records Click over this link

Varieties of our local Hutton Roof Gentians and the reason for the 50/50 Purple and White, plus my research survey results. Plus "Upland Enchanters Nightshade (circae x intermedia)

 More Autumn Gentian photos (2020) can be seen here

Northern Greenland Wheatear (Oenanthe o. leucorrhoa)
Crossbills (chicks in late December etc)



It was great to see our friend Chris Packham jumping up and down with joy when he reviewed the new orchid book ‘Britain’s Orchids’ by Sean Cole and Mike Waller.  He had nothing but praise for the book stating that it was ‘fantastically detailed”. If you do want to see Chris reviewing the book then please go to: https://youtu.be/slvjlwAdly8 (please make sure to scroll along to 1 hour and 19 minutes and then you dont miss anything)




I was even more chuffed to see that Chris had even picked the Dark Red Helleborine to be one of his review pages, whilst at the same time highlighting one of my own photograph contributions to the book which depicts the rare yellow form of atrorubens or maybe better known variety which many of us call the Pallens.

Not just Chris was jumping up and down with joy, but I like many others around the country are so pleased on how the book as turned out, with so much valuable information on every orchid species and not just the flower, but to include the early rosettes, the leaf build and their markings, and were possible to give so many photographic examples of both variety and hybrids of all taxons especially in regards to the intricacies of the fabled complicated Marsh orchids.

I can see why orchid lovers are already snapping up the original paintings from Sarah Stribbling who has contributed the artwork to the book. Her work is outstanding with every plate showing clear definition and brilliance, the patience and skill she has afforded to these are a credit.

I have only spent a couple of hours so far glancing through the book with the very exception of the 'atrorubens' which I have checked from start to finish, but do intend to spend a lot of time on this book going from cover to cover and trying to digest the wealth of knowledge kindly passed on through these two great orchid lovers. The book just as to be a winner with all orchid lovers especially within the UK whether they be early day orchid students or the more mature student. 

I must say by having this book in my possession that I do feel far more confident now towards help with identifications even the more intricate varieties





Monday, 7 September 2020

Wed Sept 9th 2020 - Checking out Field Gentians on Holme Stinted Pastures. - Sat Sept 5th 2020 - Checking out more Autumn Gentians on Holme Park Fell - Thurs Sept 3rd 2020 - checking out Field Gentians on Holme Stinted Pastures, and more surveying of Autumn Gentians on Holme Park Fell.

 Links: 

"FOR UP TO DATE" 2020 Visible Bird Migration records Click over this link

Varieties of our local Hutton Roof Gentians and the reason for the 50/50 Purple and White, plus my research survey results. Plus "Upland Enchanters Nightshade (circae x intermedia)

 More Autumn Gentian photos (2020) can be seen here

Northern Greenland Wheatear (Oenanthe o. leucorrhoa)
Crossbills (chicks in late December etc)


Wednesday September 9th 2020 - Holme Stinted Pastures - Checking out Field Gentians etc. 

Holme Stinted Pastures

Today I spent checking out the Field Gentian on Holme Stinted Pastures, it was sunny at times, but a cold wind which did not help in opening up the gentians. I think I can safely say we will only get around 30 in total this year (compared to 300 plus last year).  Its the other way around this year and the year of the Autumn Gentian. Besides Gentians I witnessed a very long black beetle which is called the Devils Coach Horse (Olypus olens) see photo. I have tried to arrange photos with some of them showing the distances between the Field Gentian and the Autumn Gentian which is of a very short distance.











************************************




Saturday September 5th 2020 - Checking out more areas on Holme Park Fell for Autumn Gentians

Approached the steep incline just past the old lime kiln on the main track leading along the quarry edge side from Holme Stints. I thought it would be good but not really although I did find some. Start at SD53873 79212 (464ft) to SD5391579386 (539ft) in 3 little sections along this route I had 54 most of which were spent, all others white and no purples found. Found another really good population on Fell escarpment which lies approx 150 yards NW of main track and here I had 67 which were very close to one another and varying purple/white. This now brings the total up to press of 3044 Autumn Gentians


Looking towards the NW

Looking to the NW and the estuary at Levens

Looking back on the incline I had just surveyed, Warton Crag high point on the horizon

On Holme Park Fell

On Holme Park Fell


Slipper Rock - Holme Park Fell 1913

Thursday September 3rd 2020 - Checking out Field Gentians on Holme Stinted Pastures, then find new old tracks and surveying Autumn Gentian on Holme Park Fell, and taking photos of "Slipper Rock" with 1913 comparison. 

Far too windy to get good photos but did manage bits and pieces.  My job today was to check out the Field Gentian and they are doing very well, quite a lot now being found slap bang next to Autumn Gentians (nearest within 8" and 14").  Over 20 plants recorded so far. I reckon it could be good in about 10 days for the Field Gentian. Nice to see them coming through now on "The Bank".

I chose a very old quarry track to investigate on the Holme Park Fell, and sure enough it proved fruitful with a further 276 Autumn Gentians over an area of about 400 yards x 20ft wide. There were mixed purple and white, probably more white, although there were lots there that were well spent. I got the impression these must have been out a lot earlier than the majority.

I finished off with a quick photo of Slipper Rock which I could compare against the original photo taken back in 1913 (only 107 years ago)

Besides Gentians and Slipper Rocks, I noted 3 parties of Linnets of 50,12 and 8 and also a party of 25 Goldfinch, heard some Bullfinch and a few Chaffinch. They all seemed happy feeding up within Holme Stints and the Fell. 

Field Gentian on Holme Stinted Pastures (Farleton side of Hutton Roof)


Shows how close Field Gentian is from Autumn Gentian only 8"


Shows how close Field Gentian is from Autumn Gentian only 14"



Shows how close Field Gentian is from Autumn Gentian only 14"



The fabulous pavements of Holme Park Fell (Farleton) today


The fabulous pavements of Holme Park Fell (Farleton) today


Slipper Rock - Holme Park Fell 2020

107 years later than the next photo



Slipper Rock - Holme Park Fell 1913
107 years earlier than the above photo



Tuesday September 1st 2020 - Hutton Roof Common (Ploverlands)


I checked out the regular spots for the Autumn Gentian on Ploverlands and it was very poor, eg: only 3 plants (1 classic purple and 2 of the white form). In the past I would have had around 30 from the same area.

Decided to go over and check out the Holly Ferns, but just as I was leaving one pavement down the steep banking I was lucky to find a few Sneezewort (achillea ptarmica) - always reminds me of "ptarmigan" the grouse type bird. It must be 5 years since I last found some Sneezewort on Hutton Roof, it just seems to turn up out of the blue. Here is a couple of photos, the leaves remind me so much of Betony.

Sneezewort

Sneezewort

Both Holly Fern 1 and Holly Fern 2 are both doing well, but they are like small versions of themselves, this year. On my way back home I bumped into Alec and told him about the size of the Hollies and he remarked he was not surprised and showed me a specimen outside of the house and this also was stunted compared to its norm!  I wonder if its the same old story, not enough water and too much heat at the wrong times, makes you wonder.

So here we have Holly Fern 2 which as always come up with a couple of fronds belonging to the "Aculeatum". Its the same every year, but the Aculeatum tends to move about sometimes the fronds may be on the left and sometimes on the right. Its strange to see both Aculeatum and Lonchitis coming out of the same root stock.

Holly Fern 2 had 10 fronds (the norm) this year which the average frond measured approx 8" x 1 1/2" wide. 

Holly Fern No. 2
Holly Fern No. 2
Holly Fern No. 2


And now I checked out Holly Fern No. 1 and that although still on the small side was doing OK.

Holly Fern No. 1 had 9 fronds (which is the norm) which measured approx 10" or 11" and at best 2" wide.

Holly Fern No.1
Holly Fern No. 1

Also found more of the Lightish to White Harebells in upper Dalton Crags.

Also a party of about 20 plus Goldfinch and Linnet mixed happily feeding on the spent Ragwort.