Saturday, 15 June 2019

Snippets of Wealth - Sat 15th June 2019 - Hutton Roof - Epipactis atrorubens and their varieties


Today I wanted to check out some of the Orchids which we have on Hutton Roof, to check their progress.  With the majority they are coming through OK but most of the larger specimens seem stunted or well behind where they should be by now, so I don't expect any miracles this year. But I am sure there will be plenty to study as the weeks go on.  I am sure it will be another fortnight before we see any flowers.

For today I would like to highlight our specimen No.9a which has come up every year since my first observations on it in 2015 although last year unfortunately it was taken down by predation.  It has always shown as a very pallid form and is in the good company of the No.9 population in which there are several which may take on this rather special pallid form.

Specimen No.9a Epipactis atrorubens var: pallens  (click over to enlarge)
Photo: taken at Hutton Roof on 17th July 2015

Specimen No.9a Epipactis atrorubens var: pallens  (click over to enlarge)
Photo: taken at Hutton Roof on 8th July 2017

Specimen No.9a Epipactis atrorubens var: pallens  (click over to enlarge)
Photo: taken at Hutton Roof on 8th July 2017

Specimen No.9a Epipactis atrorubens var: pallens  (click over to enlarge)
Photo: taken at Hutton Roof on 15th June 2019

Specimen No.9a Epipactis atrorubens var: pallens  (click over to enlarge)
Photo: taken at Hutton Roof on 15th June 2019

Now then what is so interesting about this particular plant is that it shows no red in the base stem or basal leaf, which is so unusual, although sometimes the flowers on this specimen can show more red than usual.

Generally I have found that in all pallen forms it is usual to get some sort of atrorubens (red) influence somewhere on the plant and in 99 times out of one hundred it would show in the base stem and basal leaf, but here we have a exception to the rule, which makes it so much more interesting for the study.

Here below is another very interesting plant which is known as Specimen Lutescens No.1 which I found back in 2014 and it has been successful each year since. It again is yet another sort of 'pallid' form and never seems to grow much above 10" in height. It has a bicolor look about it in that the petals are a lemony yellow colour and the sepals are more of a reddish wash colour along with the ovary and stem also being darker, but what is rather striking about this specimen is the cream epichile and bosses, before I do show today's photo let me show you how it has looked back in 2014 which has not changed much in appearance up to last year.

Epipactis atrorubens var: Lutescens (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Hutton Roof 2014

Epipactis atrorubens var: Lutescens (Click over to enlarge)
Photo: Hutton Roof 15th June 2019

And here below is yet another one of our special orchids which looks like it may be OK this year......




Monday, 10 June 2019

Snippets of Wealth - Monday 10th June 2019 - Dalton Crags and Hutton Roof Common/Green Spleenwort/Holly Ferns/Spring Sandwort etc



Lasiommata megera (Wall Brown Butterfly) feeding on Wild Thyme today on Hutton Roof
Photo: Hutton Roof on 10th June 2019 - Click over to enlarge

Birds and Butterflies today included: 

Garden Warblers at least 5, the regular Lr Dalton Crags families together with one singing at usual place near Holly Fern, also one singing on Ploverlands. Lots of Willow Warblers still singing with melodious charm, whilst taking about 'charm' I also had a pair of Goldfinch in Dalton Crags along with two pairs of breeding Stonechats, Green Woodpecker yaffling, Tree Pipits (2 sites) I also had a Chiffchaff or two in the bottom. But surprisingly no Whitethroats, no Cuckoo and no Linnets today. 

A better day with plenty of on/off sunshine and little breeze enabled me to see my very first of the year Small Pearl Bordered Fritillary in Lr Dalton, also a Wall Brown on The Common, a Large White and 14 Small Heath butterflies at various points between Lr Dalton and Ploverlands.  Also had a Cinnabar moth and I can say I have never seen so many lovely bumblebees throughout.  Was getting several feeding on the Spring Sandwort.


Boloria selene (Small Pearl Bordered Fritillary) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Dalton Crags on 10th June 2019

Asplenium viride (Green Spleenwort) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof 10th June 2019

Just had to check on both the Green Spleenwort and the Holly Ferns whilst in the area and everything is looking good with the majority of the fronds looking well

 Polystichum lonchitis (Holly Fern No.1) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof on 10th June 2019

Polystichum lonchitis (Holly Fern No.1) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof on 10th June 2019


 Polystichum lonchitis (Holly Fern No.2) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof on 10th June 2019

 Polystichum lonchitis (Holly Fern No.2) Click over to enlarge
Photo: Hutton Roof on 10th June 2019

Polystichum ?
Photo: Hutton Roof, 10th June 2019

This particular aculeatum ? (above), has interested me now for quite some time, or should I say that the one above this frond in the photo, although today it's new frond (shown here) follows it by replica almost!  Interestingly the specimen lies about 6ft down a limestone gryke and is unreachable. 


Polygonatum odoratum (Angular Solomons Seal)
Nice specimen which creeps along the gryke in upright posture
Photo: Hutton Roof 10th June 2019


 Minuartia Verna (Spring Sandwort)
A nice colony on the side of a ant-hill and shows pollinater, in fact 3 of the same sort of bumblebees were participating at the same time
Photo: Hutton Roof on 10th June 2019


Minuartia Verna (Spring Sandwort)
A nice colony on the side of a ant-hill 
Photo: Hutton Roof on 10th June 2019

 Now then this is a Polystichum aculeatum (Hard Shield Fern) Click over to enlarge
Still not reached full growth
Photo: Hutton Roof, on 10th June 2019


 Now then this is a Polystichum aculeatum (Hard Shield Fern) Click over to enlarge
Still not reached full growth
Photo: Hutton Roof, on 10th June 2019



Now then this is a Polystichum aculeatum (Hard Shield Fern) Click over to enlarge
Still not reached full growth
Photo: Hutton Roof, on 10th June 2019

Sunday, 9 June 2019

Snippets of Wealth - Sunday 9th June 2019 - Hutton Roof/Peacock butterfly larva/P.Multiflorumxodoratum - hybrid/Dark Red Helleborine etc etc


A view at Burton Fell today 9th June 2019

Birds and Butterflies today included: Several Willow Warblers (still in full melodious call), a couple of Garden Warblers, one Chiffchaff.  Also 2 Small Heath butterflies

Before charging off up the fells, I wanted to check some spent Polygonatum multiflorum (Solomon's Seal) or it's hybrid which is on the side of the Clawthorpe Road and today I found it almost smothered by the surrounding vegetation which was primarily Alliaria petiolata (Garlic Mustard), I have studied the Solomons Seal hybrid now for a year or two and presumed it was perhaps deposited there some time ago, but it has been a helpful specimen for me to study and which has helped to give me a much clearer vision towards the differences between the natural odoratum" (Angular Solomon's Seal) which we have on the fells in comparison to it's garden comparisons.  Today I managed to check out the taller stem of the multiflorum and noticed that it was 'terete' and at the point were it actually tapered (perhaps 16" from the tip) it became just slightly 'angled' which immediately gave me thoughts of 'hybrid angular'.  Another interesting fact was to find odd 'berries' present which I would not have expected. Here are some of the photos to try and help with the differences...


Polygonatum multiflorum x odoratum = P. hybridum (Solomon's Seal hybrid)
Photo: Showing more rounded stem in hybridum, yet in the final 15" before the tip it becomes more tapered with ridges or 'angles' (see next photo)

Polygonatum multiflorum x odoratum = P. hybridum (Solomon's Seal hybrid)
Photo: Showing the stem of a typical hybridum in the final 15" which has become more tapered (thinner) and now includes more defined ridges (or angulars). Also note it shows the fruit or berry still hanging from it's pedicel.
  
Moving on the next thing I saw just as I had entered the fields were plenty of Peacock butterfly larvae heavily group and breaking out of their web cocoon to explore their food plant the Urtica dioica (Common Stinging Nettle)

Peacock butterfly larvae - Hutton Roof - 9th June 2019


Ophrys insectifera (Fly Orchid) on Hutton Roof
Photo: Hutton Roof 9th June 2019
I dont think for one minute its been the best year for Fly Orchids on Hutton Roof although I have counted scores and possibly up to 100, but they don't seem to have lasted long this year especially with most of them going over very quickly. Here above is one on show today.



Specimen 33 Epipactis schmalhauseneii (Epipactis atrorubens x helleborine) (Dark Red Helleborine x Broad Leaved Helleborine)

This is one of our regulars Specimen 33 which is thought to be a hybrid. It is also rather special because the past few years have shown it mature with a white (or light) epichile and boss.  There are several more atrorubens (or even hybrids) which are in the immediate area which are thought to be offspring from this very plant.  Below are two plants almost in tandam which lie (within inches) just to the left of Specimen 33 and all within the shadow of a small hazel tree


Epipactis atrorubens - possibly related to Specimen 33
Photo: Hutton Roof on 9th June 2019


Specimen Schalhauseneii 15,15a,15b - all suspect hybrids
Photo: Hutton Roof 9th June 2019

The suspected Schmalhauseneii specimens 15,15a and 15b have again had their cage provided, because everytime they come through they seem to be get brought down by the Brown Hare and he waits until they are with full spike, so I am trying to preserve them. Although we cannot blame the old Hare for last years outcome!

You can see the specimens are far from their normal size which by now should have been about 10" tall, and this is because they like so many others were brought down last year half way through their early growth and left to dieback. This was the outcome caused directly through lack of water (draught situation) during May and June 2018. Like others they are coming through now but rather stunted growth showing at the moment. I hopefully will be able to post later.


Specimen Escarp 13 - Epipactis atrorubens (bicolor)
Photo: Hutton Roof 9th June 2019

Since my last report it's really good news with this specimen. I reported that I had found no evidence of Escarp 13, but today that's all changed by noticing a small shoot starting to develop but much stunted at the moment. You can actually see the last three years old spikes showing.

Its a lovely plant, which is one of the tallest of 'lempets (bicolor)" it would under normal conditions grow to about 30" and can bear up to 40 (bicolor) flowers


Specimen 74 Epipactis atrorubens (bicolor)
Photo: Hutton Roof on 9th June 2019

Again it's more good news after my last report, with today being able to confirm that our lovely Specimen 74 has come through along with a new partner! The shoots look so dark at the moment and there is no problem identifying to which genus they belong, but again the plant is much stunted in growth compared to its normal at this time of year which would be about 8" in growth.

A special 'bicolor' specimen of about 15" height and bearing 18 flowers/buds with lemon petalled and red sepals. It also bears a white (or light form) epichile and bosses. 


Specimen Escarp 8 - Epipactis atrorubens var: pallens
Hutton Roof 9th June 2019

Even more good news! today I did manage to find one of our special "pallens" starting to come through OK - Escarp No.8

Another lost last year part way through early growth, so fingers crossed this year.

Epipactis helleborine (Broad Leaved Helleborine) (light flower variant)
Photo: Hutton Roof on 9th June 2019

 This beauty above is a light form of Broad Leaved Helleborine and already today it stands at about 18" tall, at this stage I cannot say whether it is chlorantha until it actually flowers, but certainly leaning that way.  But sadly the last two years it has fallen victim to either Roe deer or Brown Hare.  So today I did have a spare cage lying about and decided to cage it in the hopes the plant may reach maturity. Check out plant above and below

Epipactis helleborine (Broad Leaved Helleborine) (light flower variant)

Photo: Hutton Roof on 9th June 2019


Gymnocarpium robertianum (Limestone Fern) (Click over to enlarge)
It lies within many of Hutton Roof's grykes and usually not far from Dryopteris sub-montana (Rigid Buckler Fern)
Photo: Hutton Roof on 9th June 2019

Friday, 7 June 2019

Snippets of Wealth - Friday 7th June 2019 - Dalton Crags - Harts Tongue unusual/Marginatum/Angular Solomons going to berry phase/Strawberries are out/Painted Lady butterfly/ etc




Today the birds were singing plentiful with lots of ditties from the Willow Warblers, noting that quite a lot of them have already given up on their beautiful melodious decending calls and gone into their more reserved short repetitive "hou-whit" calls which are usually a sign that marking of territory is just not that important anymore, however the contact calls are very much the game of play...  Also had Garden Warblers, Chiffchaffs, a single Tree Pipit and a distant Raven calling.  With it not being too sunny the butterflies were not plentiful although I did have two Small Heaths and a very pleasant surprise with a pristine looking Painted Lady.

This year noticing long lengthy specimens of Rigid Buckler Ferns compared to past years eg: 18" plus, also plenty of very insipid looking (Asplenium scolopendrium) Harts Tongue Ferns, Strawberries now out but better in about a week to ten days time.


 Asplenium scolopendrium (Harts Tongue Fern)
This beauty was on show this morning with its curled tips.  Its just a "one off frond"
the others in the same group appeared normal.
Photo: Dalton Crags on 7th June 2019

Asplenium scolopendrium (Harts Tongue Fern)
This beauty was on show this morning with its curled tips.  Its just a "one off frond"
the others in the same group appeared normal.
Photo: Dalton Crags on 7th June 2019


 Asplenium scolopendrium (Harts Tongue Fern)
This beauty was on show this morning with its curled tips.  Its just a "one off frond"
the others in the same group appeared normal.
Photo: Dalton Crags on 7th June 2019


 Asplenium scolopendrium (Harts Tongue Fern)
This beauty was on show this morning with its curled tips.  Its just a "one off frond"
the others in the same group appeared normal.
This photo shows the back of the frond
Photo: Dalton Crags on 7th June 2019

Asplenium trichomanes (Maidenhair spleenwort)
Never had one of these before!! what makes the specimen start diminishing
sizes of pinnae half way down the frond .
This by the way is still last years and as yet no new growth alongside.
Photo: Dalton Crags on 7th June 2019

 Asplenium scolopendrium 'marginatum' (Harts Tongue Fern 'marginatum')
To my knowledge now in its 3rd year of 'marginatum' all fronds within group showing same
Photo: Dalton Crags 7th June 2019


 Asplenium scolopendrium 'marginatum' (Harts Tongue Fern 'marginatum')
To my knowledge now in its 3rd year of 'marginatum' all fronds within group showing same
Photo: Dalton Crags 7th June 2019


 Polygonatum odoratum (Angular Solomons Seal)
beautiful little posy taken over small little gryke in centre of limestone boulder
Photo: Dalton Crags on 7th June 2019 


 Polygonatum odoratum (Angular Solomons Seal)
Showing a very early transformation from flower to green berry
Photo: Dalton Crags on 7th June 2019 


 Fragaria vesca (Wild Strawberry)
out now on Dalton Crags best in one week from now 7th June 2019


 Fragaria vesca (Wild Strawberry)
out now on Dalton Crags best in one week from now 7th June 2019


Fragaria vesca (Wild Strawberry)
out now on Dalton Crags best in one week from now 7th June 2019

Pilosella officinarum (Mouse-ear Hawkweed) in Dalton Crags - click over to enlarge
showing large matted area
Photo: Dalton Crags 7th June 2019